Center for Regional & Tribal Child Welfare Studies

Summer Institute in American Indian Child Welfare

The Summer Institute in American Indian Child Welfare is an opportunity for Tribal child welfare workers and administrators to spend three days together developing new practice skills, sharing their collective experiences, and learning with Indian Child Welfare professionals and scholars in a Tribal context.

2013 Summer Institute

"Restoring Balance: Addressing Sexual Abuse in Our Communities"

July 22nd - 24th, 2013

Where: Northern Lights Casino & Event Center, Walker MN*

*A block of hotel rooms has been reserved at Northern Lights. Please ask for the "Summer Institute in Child Welfare" rate when making reservations.

Who: All Tribal Child Welfare Staff and Administrators are invited!

Minnesota Board of Social Work approved CEU's will be available.

What: Summer Institute Brochure

For questions, please contact Jackie at phone: 218-726-7854

2012 Summer Institute

The Center for Regional and Tribal Child Welfare Studies in the UMD Department of Social Work successfully presented at the 5th annual Summer Institute in American Indian Child Welfare in July of 2012. With support from the Casey Family Programs and tribes across Northern Minnesota, the Center held a no-cost, four day seminar for tribal child welfare workers, administrators, and students. Over 100 tribal child welfare workers and administrators spent three days at the Northern Lights Hotel and Casino in Walker, Minnesota. In addition, approximately 20 undergraduate and graduate child welfare students attended the Summer Institute from the University of Minnesota Duluth, the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, as well as undergraduate social work programs across Minnesota. This year attendees were able to hear the Honorable Judge Bill Thorne present about using the Indian Child Welfare Act as a basis for best practice, learn in more detail about the trauma of the boarding school era and how that plays out in American Indian communities today, attend a teaching sweat lodge, and learn about the extended family, clan, and kin systems of Anishinaabe people. The Institute ended with a traditional feast and powwow, featuring many local families. Attendees reported great satisfaction with the Institute. One student wrote, "Miigwetch to the Anishinaabe people for allowing students to attend your gathering. It was an experience I will hold close to my heart."

2012 Video Clips and Powerpoints

2011 Summer Institute

The Center for Regional and Tribal Child Welfare Studies in the UMD Department of Social Work successfully presented the 4th Annual Summer Institute in American Indian Child Welfare in July of 2011. With support from tribes across northern Minnesota, the Center held a no-cost, four day seminar for tribal child welfare workers, administrators, and students. Over 100 tribal child welfare workers and administrators spent three days at the Northern Lights Hotel and Casino in Walker, Minnesota. In addition, approximately 20 undergraduate and graduate child welfare students attended the Summer Institute from the University of Minnesota Duluth, the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, as well as undergraduate social work programs across Minnesota. Participants were able to learn from American Indian scholars and professionals across the region. UMD alumni, partners of the Center including: Terry Cross, the Executive Director of the National Indian Child Welfare Association; Minnesota tribal child welfare program administrators; and tribal elders and spiritual leaders shared their expertise throughout the week. The Institute ended with a drum and dance celebration that included youth from the Leech Lake reservation. New to the Summer Institute this year was the addition of the Tribal Child Welfare Directors Summit, consisting of tribal leaders from around the state who gathered to discuss contemporary tribal issues and accomplishments. The Institute was a resounding success. One of the Summer Institute's featured speakers, Terry Cross, stated that the Summer Institute "is one of my favorite events of the year". Participants reported 100 percent overall satisfaction with the speakers and presenters, as well as 100 percent agreement that the content was relevant to their practice.

2011 Summary of Evaluations

2011 Video Clips and Powerpoints

2010 Summer Institute

The Center for Regional and Tribal Child Welfare Studies in the UMD Department of Social Work successfully presented the 3rd Annual Summer Institute in American Indian Child Welfare in July of 2010. With support from tribes across northern Minnesota, the Center held a no-cost, four day seminar for tribal child welfare workers and administrators. Approximately 100 tribal child welfare workers and administrators spent four days at the Northern Lights Hotel and Casino in Walker, Minnesota. Participants were able to learn from American Indian scholars and professionals across the region. UMD alumni; partners with the Center including: Terry Cross, the Executive Director of the National Indian Child Welfare Association; Tribal judges and attorneys; Minnesota tribal child welfare programs and administrators; and tribal elders and spiritual leaders shared their experience throughout the week. This past year 24 undergraduate and graduate child welfare students attended the Summer Institute from the University of Minnesota Duluth, the University of Minnesota Twin Cities, as well as undergraduate social work programs across Minnesota. The Institute ended with a drum and dance celebration that included youth from the Leech Lake reservation.

2010 Summary of Evaluations

2012 Video Clips and Powerpoints

2009 Summer Institute

The Center for Regional and Tribal Child Welfare Studies, UMD Department of Social Work, is proud to announce that the second annual Summer Institute in American Indian Child Welfare was held July 20-24, 2009 at Northern Lights Casino & Event Center and was a tremendous success. With support from tribes across northern Minnesota, the Center held a no-cost, week long training opportunity for tribal child welfare workers and administrators to develop new practice skills, share collective experiences and learn from American Indian child welfare professionals and scholars from a tribal perspective. Over 100 tribal child welfare workers and administrators from Minnesota, Wisconsin, South Dakota, Michigan and Canada traveled to Leech Lake reservation for this important event. UMD Social Work students were able to receive Masters level credit for participating in the Institute. UMD is hopeful that future years will build on the success of this terrific opportunity and help create a child welfare system that is responsive to the needs and strengths of American Indian families.

2009 Summary of Evaluations

2009 Schedule

2009 Session Descriptions

2008 Summer Institute

2008 Presentation Video Clips

Clips can be viewed using Quicktime. To download Quicktime, go to http://www.apple.com/downloads/

Please note that the presenters during the 2008 Summer Institute did not use microphones. As a result the volume level on some videos was low and your computer speakers may have to be adjusted accordingly.

If you are interested in viewing or obtaining a copy of the full length DVD's of any 2008 Summer Institute presentations, please contact Jackie Heytens at jheytens@d.umn.edu or 218-726-7854.

Creating an Emotionally Healthy Work Environment with Terry Cross

Clip Length: 31 minutes

Full Presentation Length: 3 hours

Summary: Working in an emotionally and spiritually healthy work environment is important for everyone, but especially for those involved in the difficult work of tribal child welfare practice. Presenter Terry Cross of the National Indian Child Welfare Association spoke about ways supervisors and managers can create and maintain an open and supportive workplace.

Courtroom Skills with Paul Day, Carol DeVerney and Judge Anita Fineday

Clip Length: 32 minutes

Full Presentation Length: 3 hours

Summary: Building on the content from the Pre-Court session, this session focused on the background tribal social workers must have for working in both Tribal and State District Courts. Through case studies, this presentation covered differences between the two types of courts, expectations of the social worker in child welfare court, and practical skills such as writing good court reports and providing testimony.

Indigenous Child Welfare Practice Models with Larry Jourdain

Clip Length: 26 minutes

Full Presentation Length: 1.5 hours

Summary: Participants in this session had the opportunity to explore various Native child welfare practice models being used throughout the United States and Canada. These tribally-developed paradigms take into account traditional tribal culture in planning and delivering child welfare services to children and families.

2008 Summary of Evaluations

2008 Schedule

2008 Session Descriptions

For more information, contact:

Jackie Heytens, Department of Social Work

218-726-7854

jheytens@d.umn.edu

 

 

 


UMD Social Work Department

220 Bohannon Hall
1207 Ordean Court
Duluth, MN 55812

1 (888) 534-9734
(218) 726-7245

umdsw@d.umn.edu



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