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Courses Available

Current courses offered by UMD's College in the Schools program (2017 - 2018). Click on the course to view the course description and credits.

If your school wants to offer a course that is not listed above, please contact Barb Perushek. To search all courses offered by the U of M system go to the Course Catalog and enter required information.

Economics and Society (3 Credits)

General description of U.S. economy and analysis of contemporary economic problems. Introduction to major economic issues and problems of the day, providing a simple framework used by economists for analysis.

Principles of Economics: Macro (3 Credits)

Analyzing overall performance of an economic system. National income accounting and theory, unemployment, inflation, fiscal policy, money, monetary policy, economic growth, international trade, non-U.S. economies, and real-world application of these concepts.

Principles of Economics: Micro (3 credits)

Analyzing free enterprise system through study of product and resource markets. Supply and demand, utility, production and cost, market structure, resource use, market failures, regulatory role of government, and real-world application of these concepts.

Great American Authors (3 credits)

Introduction to American authors important for their artistic mastery and/or significant role in American literary history.

20th Century Literature (4 Credits)

Readings primarily in American, British, and Irish literature.

Introduction to Literatire (3 Credits)

Literary modes and methods of literary study and interpretation.

World Regional Geography

World Regional Geography offers an overview of the different regions which comprise the world. This course analyzes the relationship between the environment, economic development, culture and politics. In terms of the weekly pacing of the course, we will focus on a different world region each week. However, in a more general sense, we will focus on the root causes of global problems, not the specifics of each world region. In this way, a central goal of this class is to challenge the notion that world regions exists in isolation from other spaces. Instead, we will analyze how regions develop and change based on how they manage their relationships with other spaces.

Human Geography (3 Credits)

Human geography is a social science that examines the world, its people, and their communities, economies, politics, and interactions with the environment. This course introduces core concepts such as space, place, and scale, and applies them to understand human society. Topics from the spread of humans around the globe, to colonialism, the geography of agriculture, urbanization, geopolitics, and racial and ethnic difference are explored.

Physical Geography (4 Credits)

The environment is highly dynamic and is continually modified by human and environmental processes. This course examines these processes to better understand how the Earth’s landscapes were formed and how they are currently being transformed. Specifically, students will understand the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment including Earth-sun relations, water resources, landforms, weather and climate, natural vegetation, and soils.

Intermediate German (4 Credits)

Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities in four modalities (speaking, listening, reading, writing), set within contemporary culture of German-speaking societies. Further development of intercultural competency. Taught in German.

Intermediate German II (4 Credits)

Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities in four modalities (speaking, listening, reading, writing), set within contemporary culture of German-speaking societies. Further development of intercultural competency. Taught in German.

World History to 1500 (4 Credits)

This course surveys world history from the emergence and development of isolated settlements to the earliest trans-oceanic interactions in the sixteenth century. It will also introduce students to the various sources and analytic techniques historians use to reconstruct the pre-modern past. Major themes include the social, political, religious, and economic ramifications of intercultural exchange and conflict in the ancient and medieval periods.

Dawn of Modern Europe(4 Credits)

Early history of the modern era: Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Reason, French Revolution and its impact, Napoleonic era.

Europe in the Modern Age (4 Credits)

Over the course of the past two centuries, the map of Europe has undergone several dramatic transformations. Empires disappeared off the map while new types of states and regimes were created. The forces of industrialization, imperialism, and nationalism brought about dramatic political, economic, social and cultural changes. At the same time, Europe extended its reach over other parts of the world. In this course, we will study the developments that have shaped European history in this period in order to better understand how we arrived at where we are today. In doing so, we will consider the many meanings of "modernity" and the impact it has had on contemporary culture.

U.S. History Part I: 1607 - 1877 (4 Credits)

Evolution of the United States from colonial origins into a modern nation.  Frontier and agrarian heritage, constitutional development, emergence of modern U.S. political system, expansion of democracy, and cultural diversity. Colonial period to 1877.

U.S. History Part II: 1865 - present (4 Credits)

Historical roots of major challenges facing Americans today: global responsibility as a world power; the quest for political, economic, and social justice; and community and family changes in modern society; 1877 to present.

Modern World History: 1500 - Present (4 Credits)

This course surveys the evolution of the world from relatively isolated regions around 1500 to the global interdependence whose trends continues to the present day.  This course will examine the emergence of the interdependence among major civilizations, especially between the West and the East.  This latest interaction was initiated by the European colonizations and sustained by the contributions of other civilizations.  Major themes of the course include the social, cultural, political, economic, demographic, and environmental ramifications of the global interaction.

Health Science Terminology (3 Credits)

Terms commonly used in health sciences and medical professions; emphasis on word structure.

Calculus I (5 Credits)

First part of a standard introduction to calculus of functions of a single variable. Limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and their applications.

Introduction to Music (3 Credits)

The course aims to allow students to develop life-long skills of focused listening with an emphasis on the appreciation of music that reflects the underlying social and geo-political situations of composers from around the world in both today's world and previous eras.

Physical Fitness (1 Credit)

Development of personal skills related to physical fitness. Understanding and application of factors and participation patterns contributing to enhanced physical fitness.

Weight Training (1 Credit)

Development of personal skills related to weight training. Understanding of principles, concepts, and conditioning regimens for participation in weight training.

Introduction to Physics (5 Credits)

Noncalculus general physics course primarily for certain preprofessional fields. Topics in mechanics, heat, and sound.

Introduction to Sociology (4 Credits)

Introduction to sociological concepts and their application.

Intermediate Spanish I (4 Credits)

Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities in the Beginning Spanish sequence. Further cultivation of the four modalities of language acquisition (speaking, listening comprehension, writing, and reading comprehension). Emphasis on oral and written production. Further development of intercultural competency as it relates to the diverse cultures of Latino and Spanish-speaking communities around the globe. Taught in Spanish.

Intermediate Spanish II (4 Credits)

Consolidation and enrichment of previously acquired abilities in Intermediate Spanish. Further cultivation of the four modalities of language acquisition (speaking, listening comprehension, writing, and reading comprehension). Emphasis on oral and written production. Further development of intercultural competency as it relates to the diverse cultures of Latino and Spanish-speaking communities around the globe. Taught in Spanish.

Introduction to Theatre Arts (3 Credits)

Appreciation of theatre arts. Developing sensitivity and critical sophistication as articulate, discriminating theatregoers. Play viewing, play reading, critiques, and term projects.

College Writing (3 Credits)

Instruction and practice in developing information literacy and skills in critical thinking, argumentation, revision, and documentation to prepare students for writing tasks they will encounter throughout college, work, and the rest of their lives. Course assignments present challenges designed to hone competence and confidence in making writing decisions for any audience, purpose, or genre.

*This course is offered as an all-year course