Semitic Alphabets

The Hebrew and Arabic alphabets developed directly from the Phoenician and have similarities of form, although the Arabic became cursive in style and the Hebrew square. Both read from right to left. Arabic script has been used for many languages where Islam came to be the dominant religion, such as Malay and Urdu. Hebrew also has been used for Yiddish (a form of German) and some forms of Arabic (e.g., Tunisian) where there was a sizeable Jewish population.

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Arabic - St. John
Arabic
St. John; London British and
Foreign Bible Society, 1897 [1379B]
Urdi - New Testament
Urdu
New Testament; London British
and Foreign Bible Society, 1860 [1025]
Malay - Genesis
Malay
Genesis; London British
and Foreign Bible Society, 1894 [1030]

Judeo-Tunisian - St. Luke
Judeo-Tunisian
St. Luke; London British
and Foreign Bible Society, 1900 [1385]
Hebrew - New Testament
Hebrew
New Testament; London, Scripture
Gift Mission, 1945 [93]
Yiddish - OT
Yiddish
Old Testament; Chicago, Chicago
Hebrew Mission, 1918 [548]

 

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