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Instructional Development Newsletter, Spring 2014: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

Instructional Development Newsletter, Fall 2013: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

Instructional Development Newsletter, Spring 2013: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

Instructional Development Newsletter, Spring 2012: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

Instructional Development Newsletter, Fall 2011: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

Instructional Development Newsletter, Spring 2011: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

Instructional Development Newsletter, Fall 2010: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

Instructional Development Newsletter, Spring 2010: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

Instructional Development Newsletter, Fall 2009: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

Instructional Development Newsletter, Spring 2009: Download a PDF file of the entire newsletter

 

Articles from Older Newsletters

Amplification: Behavior Gone Wild? Human behavior has not changed much over time because people have always needed to connect and socialize. From the earliest cavemen and women crouching around a fire exchanging mammoth tales to “millennials” crowding together over pizza and beer swapping escapades, the need to connect is at our core. Then and now, we are social creatures who want to know what others are doing; to be where our friends are...

Challenging Questions for Millennials in the College Classroom: Why Read? Why Attend College? In recent years, I have been amazed at the extent to which many college students do not do all of the assigned reading in their classes (sometimes not even purchasing the books for their courses). I wanted to arrive at ways of encouraging students to do the required reading in a way that is both supportive and positive, rather than relying upon fear tactics. First, I needed to understand the students’ perspective and to learn what obstacles or disincentives might be involved in their choice of whether or not to complete assigned reading in their courses.

Communicating Effectively with Your Professor: In this article, Jennifer offers an example of her proactive approach to dealing with e-mail. This is what she gives to her students at the beginning of each semester.

Digging Deeper into Discussions: Discussion-based teaching can increase student learning in well-delineated ways. When it is successful, it can broaden and deepen understanding of the topic at hand by examining it, encourage discussants to articulate what may have only been a vague feeling about a subject (I don’t know what I think until I say/write it), enliven learning through engagement, develop proficiencies needed for democratic debate, and help students develop tolerance for and appreciation of diverse opinions and viewpoints. Ideally, that is...

Internationalizing On-Campus Courses: Constructivist psychologist George Kelly (1963) observed that, “Experience does not constitute being in the vicinity of events as they occur, but in how one construes those events.” By making a distinction between experience and perception, Kelly’s statement draws attention to the heart of what it means to internationalize on-campus courses/curriculum (IOCC). It explains why internationalizing is not merely the addition of a unit on international perspectives or adding a new book introducing intercultural material or case studies, because students will construe or make sense of those materials through their own cultural lenses....

Introducing UMD's Knowledge Management Center: What started five years ago as a gleam in Paul Treuer's eye, was formalized in a proposal two years ago, and fall 2005 saw the opening of the UMD Knowledge Management Center in 42 Solon Campus Center. The KMC's mission, according to its flyer, is to "offer assistance [in] using technologies designed for personal and professional record management." In addition, it is available as a wonderful space for technology assisted presentations and trainings.

Note to Father: This Is Hard: I remember walking with my father across the campus of the University of South Florida, where he was a professor of English, and being in awe as students would call him "Dr. Hatcher." Sometimes I would go to his classes and listen to him lecture, convinced that his intellect was unsurpassed. He exuded a confident, comfortable demeanor; my father knew everything there was to know…

PowerPointers: Tips for Students and Faculty: Students who have not previously created a PowerPoint presentation often ask me for pointers for using the program. This is more or less what I tell them. When using PowerPoint or other presentational aids, new and current users of these tools will profit from reading or reviewing these tips for creating PowerPoint with punch...

Putting a Face on Online: Connecting without a Classroom: What’s your biggest concern about teaching when the students aren’t physically in the same room or the same “time zone” as you are? As more classes are conducted online, the potential for anonymity increases. I fear the loss of social connection with them. I mourn the potential loss of motivation that connection and presence give me and my students. I have always used a kind of personableness to energize the classroom. Without that ace up my pedagogical sleeve, I feel handicapped. I lament the loss of eye contact; of visual cues of smiling, clowning, pouting, gesturing; the opportunities to pick up on an idea and run with it; and, in some narcissistic way, the chance to be on stage some of the time....

Student Laptops in College Classrooms: Upsides and Downsides: A puzzling paradox and an amusing ambivalence surround student use of laptops in the classroom. On one hand, many colleges and institutions are mandating that students not only have laptops, but specifying criteria and characteristics for those machines. On the other hand, others are considering banning student use of laptops in class....

Teaching is a Relational Activity: How you and your students get along affects how far and how fast you move along the path to learning. Teaching is a relational activity. Respectful interpersonal relationships are key to successful learning. We don’t want our students to feel that their classroom questions are “treated like a bump in the road to lecture,” as one student so aptly put it.

Teaching with Diversity in Mind: As a person who has spent the last twenty years studying and teaching intercultural and diversity communication, I have learned a reasonable amount about articulating the breadth and depth of "difference" as it occurs and is "played out" in my classroom, yet I was blindsided by how the basic need to expand the experience of my own family had escaped me. It was a stunning reminder that one of the perks that those of us with white privilege enjoy is the freedom to disengage the process when we are too busy, too tired, or too overwhelmed. This can lead to blind spots for even the most well-meaning of us. Most importantly, it jolted me into reevaluating my experience of, and teaching about, cultural difference.....

The Way We Were, the Way They Are: Looking at Millenials: Can you imagine a scene played out as follows? Terry, a student in your 1xxx level course, shows up for class -well, most of the time, and proceeds to fall asleep - most of the time. For some reason, this student is only doing "C" work. Terry has never been to see you outside of class. One day you return to an urgent voice mail message from Terry's mother. She cannot understand why Terry is not being more successful in your class and would like you to return her long distance message as soon as possible.....

What’s Happening in Civic Engagement? Making a Difference, That’s What! Civic engagement offers students relevant and valuable exposure to, knowledge about, and experience in their community. Their assignments move them outside the classroom and into Duluth’s schools and community organizations where they build relationships with people and learn to make connections while simultaneously receiving college credit. This preparation for life outside and after college, is recognized by many faculty members as key to a successful educational experience for students.....

Wikis or Blogs, Blogs And Wikis? Because wikis and blogs are newcomers to the educational technology scene, deciding when and how to use them best can be puzzling for faculty. Although versions of wikis and blogs vary, each has a unique personality and strengths that make them useful tools for accomplishing specific educational objectives. This article offers information that can be used to answer the question: Should I use a wiki or blog or a blog and a wiki? ....

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