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Honors Courses

 

 

Fall 2014

 

Intercultural Communication (COMM 3535 Section 001*)
Michael Sunnafrank
Course # 29657
TuTh 6pm – 9:40pm
4 credits
Fulfills Cultural Diversity in the US liberal education requirement (old Social Science Category 6 and also the International Perspectives requirement)

*note that this section can be taken by UH students as a contract course. Ryan Goei's Intercultural Communication (COMM 3535 Section 550) is a standard UH course and is open to freshmen only.

Intercultural Communication (COMM 3535 Section 550**)
Ryan Goei
Course # 29657
TuTh 6pm – 9:40pm
4 credits
Fulfills Cultural Diversity in the US liberal education requirement (old Social Science Category 6 and also the International Perspectives requirement)

**this section is open to incoming UH freshmen only


Intercultural Communication is an extremely popular and rewarding class opportunity for UH students. Intercultural Communication is a very unique class. There are no textbooks. It is an applied class in which students engage with each other, a culturally diverse group of classmates, to learn about individuals and their experience with culture and communication here in the US and around the world. The class is based on the notion that to understand people and culture one must start by getting to know the person. As such the class requirements are almost exclusively relational in nature. You will be engaging in and writing about out-of-class “dates” with classmates from other cultures and will be participating in several class activities and trips (including two all day Saturday trips) to spend some time together building friendships. In the past these relationship-building class activities have included picnics, canoeing, swimming, camping, roller-skating, competitions, and dining out, amongst others. Students leave this class with an immensely personal understanding of humans and how culture affects their lives and views. They also often leave the class with lifelong friends, friends from various cultures both within the US and around the globe.

Intercultural Communication fulfills the Cultural Diversity in the United States requirement of UMD’s Liberal Education Program requirements. It is a four-credit class that begins the first week of Fall semester, like all others, but lasts only six weeks instead of sixteen. The class is time intensive early but complete before midterm exams are scheduled for most other classes.

 

Special Topics: Psychology of Drinking and Alcohol Misuse (HON 3095 Section 550)
Scott Carlson
Course # 34804
MWF 11-11:50
3 credits
Fulfills Social Science liberal education category (students using the pre-2012 liberal education program will need to consult with Dr. Carlson and petition CEHSP for lib ed credit)


Alcohol use is common in North America and alcohol misuse is a major social, psychiatric, and public health problem in the United States. This course provides both an overview of psychological perspectives on the causes of drinking and alcoholism and an introduction to major theories within the broader discipline of psychology. Students will be exposed to general concepts and perspectives in major sub-disciplines within psychology and these will then be applied specifically to the study of alcohol use and problems. An emphasis is placed on how psychologists empirically approach answering questions through quantitative research. Students will be mentored in the writing of relevant types of proposals needed in the conduct of research in this field.

 

Special Topics: The World of Surfing (HON 3095 Section 551)
Scott Laderman
Course # 34805
TuTh  9:15-10:55am
4 credits
Fulfills both Humanities and Global Perspectives liberal education categories 
(students using the pre-2012 liberal education program will need to consult with Dr. Laderman and petition CEHSP for lib ed credit)


The World of Surfing will combine the classroom study of the history of surfing with pool- and Lake Superior-based instruction on how to surf.  Surfing is of course a major cultural phenomenon, having spawned numerous movies, television programs, novels, works of visual art, video games, bands, and lines of clothing.  The course will examine the basis for this popularity, tracing the sport's modern evolution from nineteenth-century Hawai'i through its global ubiquity in the twenty-first century.  Along the way, we will explore surfing's intersection with some of the major developments of the last two hundred years: empire-building and the "civilizing mission," economic and cultural modernization, the growth of international tourism, the political upheavals of the Cold War era, and corporate globalization.  In addition to this classroom content, we will spend time in the UMD pool, where students will learn and develop surfing skills, which they will ultimately put to use during a surfing outing on Lake Superior.

 

Global Issues (SW 1212 Section 001)
Dennis Falk
Course # 31761
TuTh 3:30-4:45pm
3 credits
Fulfills Social Science and Global Perspective liberal education category (old category 8—Contemporary Social Issues and Analysis)


Focus on global problems of war, peace, and national security; population, food, and hunger; environmental concerns and global resources; economic and social development; human rights. Examination of issues from systems, problem solving, and futurist perspectives in honors seminar format. 

Spring 2014

 

Honors Contemporary Mathmatics (MATH 1024)
Carmen Latterell
550 LEC , 09:00 A.M. - 09:50 A.M. , M,W,F (01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014) , MonH  206
3 credits 
Fulfills LOGIC AND QUANTITATIVE REASONING lib ed category (old category 2)


Mathematics is both a powerful tool and a beautiful liberal education topic in and of itself. Yet, many people’s view of mathematics is one of a dry, boring, numeric subject. This course aims to increase awareness and appreciation of the uses, richness, and power of mathematics. We will explore graph theory, scheduling, linear programming, statistical sampling and inference, coding information, decision making, voting theory, game theory, geometric growth, symmetry, patterns, interest rates, and other topics. Our exploration will include discussion, writing, reporting, researching, projects, and other techniques usually reserved for non-mathematics classes. We will use technological tools to replace tedious operations, and learn instead how mathematics can enrich YOUR life.

 

Honors Creating Art (FA 1102)
Justin Rubin
550 LEC, 02:00 P.M. - 02:50 P.M. , M,W,F (01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014) , H  222
3 credits
Fulfills FINE ARTS lib ed category (old category 9)


Creating Art explores film, painting, sculpture, dance, poetry, performance art, animation, and music - almost exclusively from a contemporary perspective - and how these arts have effected change across the globe. Students have the opportunity to find out what issues underlined the creations of selected challenging artists - individuals you won't normally find in your typical arts class and definitely nothing you'll find in a textbook.  

As a capstone, students collaborate on a project that identifies their own issues that have meaning as to what's going on in their own lives and articulate it in a manner that can be as experimental as those we have discussed in class.

 

Honors Global Infectious Diseases (HON 3095)
John Dahl
550 LEC, 09:00 A.M. - 09:50 A.M. , M,W,F (01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014) , SSB  207A
4 credits
Fulfills GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES lib ed category (students with the old requirements can petition to have this course counted as a lib ed. Go to your college's main office for the paperwork.)


Prior to the discovery of antibiotics in the first half of the 20th century, infectious diseases regularly killed huge numbers of human beings, and epidemics have routinely altered historical events in communities and whole societies.  In the past several decades, improvements in public health and availability of effective drugs have greatly reduced human morbidity and mortality.  However, the threats of drug-resistance and new emerging infectious diseases pose increasing challenges to global health.  In this course we will examine microbiology, epidemiology, health management, and social impacts of several major infectious diseases from historical and global perspectives.  Infections will include influenza, HIV/AIDS, cholera, tuberculosis, malaria, and syphilis as well as others. Necessary biological background will be provided where appropriate, e.g. the anatomy/physiology of the human respiratory, digestive, circulatory, integumentary, and immune systems.  We will also look at antibiotic discovery and the molecular actions of antibiotics and explanations for why antibiotic resistance occurs.

 

Introduction to World Literature (ENG 1582)
John Schwetman
550 LEC, 08:00 A.M. - 09:50 A.M., Tu,Th (01/21/2014 - 05/09/2014) , Engr  177
4 credits
Fulfills HUMANITIES and GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES lib ed category (old category 9)


What is it like to live in a slum in Lagos, Nigeria? Or in the Russian countryside in the Nineteenth Century? How might a precocious teenager survive an Islamic revolution in Iran? Literature offers readers perspectives on unfamiliar ways of living in faraway parts of the world, and this course offers students a way to examine some of the most influential non-Anglo-American literature of our current time. The course begins with a non-English European literary work in translation, and then offers students a sampling of prose and poetic works from other regions to confront students with the literary production and life experience of writers from around the world, especially from parts of the developing world in Africa and Asia.

 

 

Fall 2013

Honors Paris in the Age of Impressionism (ARTH 1400)
Robyn Roslak
001 LEC , 12:00 P.M. - 01:15 P.M. , M,W (09/03/2013 - 12/13/2013) , ABAH  345
3 credits 


What comes to mind when you hear the word "Paris?" The Eiffel Tower, perhaps, or cafes and cabarets like the Moulin Rouge? Maybe you imagine grand boulevards lined with trees and clogged with traffic, or tiny cobblestone streets where mom and pop shops and artisanal workshops are the rule. And then there are the Parisians themselves--workers, families, students, fashionistas and artists--who give the city its human character. This Paris, the one most of us imagine today, was born in the mid-19th century, during the era of Impressionist painting. In this seminar we'll study how the Impressionists represented the city, from its streets with their stately monuments to its glittering nightlife to its impoverished underbelly. We'll also read poems and a novel written by contemporaries of the artists, in order to further explore how creative intellectuals envisioned the 'city of light.' No prior knowledge of French art, literature or language is required, and everyone is welcome!  

 

Honors Intercultural Communication (COM 2929 Section 002)
Michael Sunnafrank
002 LEC , 06:00 P.M. - 09:40 P.M. , Tu,Th (09/03/2013 - 10/18/2013) , ABAH  425, BohH  104
4 credits 


Intercultural Communication is a very unique class. There are no textbooks. It is an applied class in which students engage with each other, a culturally diverse group of classmates, to learn about individuals and their experience with culture and communication here in the US and around the world. The class is based on the notion that to understand people and culture one must start by getting to know the person. As such the class requirements are almost exclusively relational in nature. You will be engaging in and writing about out-of-class “dates” with classmates from other cultures and will be participating in several class activities and trips (including two all day Saturday trips) to spend some time together building friendships. In the past these relationship-building class activities have included picnics, canoeing, swimming, camping, roller-skating, competitions, and dining out, amongst others. Students leave this class with an immensely personal understanding of humans and how culture affects their lives and views. They also often leave the class with lifelong friends, friends from various cultures both within the US and around the globe. Intercultural Communication fulfills the Cultural Diversity in the United States requirement of UMD’s Liberal Education Program requirements. It is a four-credit class that begins the first week of Fall semester, like all others, but lasts only six weeks instead of sixteen. The class is time intensive early but complete before midterm exams are scheduled for most other classes. Student demand for this class is extremely high. It usually fills up within minutes of its registration opening. But UMD freshman Honors students have priority registration and immediate access to 15 seats in this class.

 

Honors Encountering Death and Grief (HLTH 3341)
H. Mitzi Doane
001 LEC , 03:15 P.M. - 06:05 P.M. , Th (09/03/2013 - 12/13/2013) , DAdB  16A
3 credits 


Health 3341, Encountering Death and Grief is not just a course, it is an experience!  We will explore a topic that is often off limits.  We will go on field trips including a crematorium, a funeral home from prep area to burial, and a hospice.  We will learn about death traditions in several cultures from a Native American pipe carrier, a rabbi, a Muslin cleric, an Hmong elder.  We will meet with survivors who have lost loved ones to murder, accident, and suicide.  We will watch some amazing films.  Be brave and join me.


Click here for information on University Honors Contract Courses


 

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