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UMD College of Liberal Arts - Center for Addiction Studies - Prevalence and Characteristics of Gambling at Four College Campuses in Northeastern Minnesota

Prevalence and Characteristics of Gambling at Four College Campuses in Northeastern Minnesota  

Rebecca E. Putz, B.A.

Lake Superior Area Family Services

Duluth , Minnesota

 

In collaboration with:

College of St. Scholastica

University of Minnesota Duluth

Lake Superior College

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College

 

Research Funding:

Lake Superior Area Family Services

College of St. Scholastica

University of Minnesota Duluth

Lake Superior College

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College

Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe

 

April 2007

Executive Summary

This report examines prevalence and characteristics of 3,710 respondents to a survey in October 2006. The survey was distributed via email to enrolled students from the College of St. Scholastica, University of Minnesota Duluth, Lake Superior College, and Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College. Forty-four questions are asked about types of gambling and frequency, venues, consequences, Internet gambling and the South Oaks Gambling Screen Revised (SOGS) (Lesieur & Blume, 1987, 1991). There were 18,161 potential respondents, resulting in a 20.4% response rate. Men were slightly underrepresented and women were slightly overrepresented in the survey. The survey was ethnically representative of the colleges combined population.

The SOGS asks 20 questions about negative consequences and experiences with gambling. Scoring breaks down as follows: 0= no problem with gambling; 1-2= may be a problem; 3-4= problem gambler; 5+= probable pathological gambler (PPG). The SOGS has been consistently used in past research on college students, and has been found valid and reliable.

Significant findings are addressed below:

Gambling Prevalence

The frequencies of the most commonly experienced games are substantially lower than the most frequently played games. Only 0.9% of respondents played slot machines on a weekly basis, and 0.7% of respondents played the lottery on a weekly basis. As seen below, Texas Hold ‘Em is the most popular game played on a weekly basis.

Gambling Problems

Four point five percent (4.5%) of all respondents indicated signs of problem and pathological gambling. National prevalence of gambling problems in college students ranges from 3% to 11%, and the average is 5%. Adult prevalence of problem and pathological gambling ranges from 1-3% (National Research Council, 1999). This survey indicates students with a gambling problem are well above the national average among adults, but are within range of gambling problems among their cohort.

 

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